COURSEWORK

A variety of neuropsychology-related courses are offered by faculty within the Neuropsychology Division. For the neuropsychology concentration, students must take three required courses (Neuroanatomy, Higher Brain Function, Adult Neuropsychological Assessment) and enroll in a specified number of electives. Depending on their specific academic interests, students may choose to take pertinent courses from other departments at the University (see UF Catalogue).

Neuropsychology Coursework
Higher Brain Function*^
Neuropsychological Assessment of Adults*
Neuropsychological Assessment of Children
Neuroanatomy in the Medical Neurosciences*
Forensic Neuropsychology
Subcortical Functions in Cognition
Experimental Methods in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Neuroscience
Neuropsychological Disorders in the Elderly
Cognitive Aging: Very Late Life
Practicum in Clinical Psychology (Neuropsychology)*^
Advanced Practicum in Neuropsychology*
Advance Specialty Practicum in Neuropsychology*

Other Courses Taught by Neuropsychology Division Faculty
Cognitive Bases of Behavior^
Adult Psychopathology^
Adult Assessment^
Measurement, Research Design And Statistics I^
Measurement, Research Design And Statistics II^
Applied Multivariate Methods in Psychology

Undergraduate Courses
Introduction to Clinical Neuropsychology
Supervised Undergraduate Research
Supervised Honors Research

*Required for Neuropsychology Students
^Program requirement for all students

NEUROPSYCHOLOGY COURSEWORK

Higher Brain Function^

Instructor: Neuropsychology Faculty
Timeline: Every other year
This course provides an overview of the classic neurobehavioral syndromes and disturbances in clinical neuropsychology/behavioral neurology . Students become familiar with variants of focal cortical and subcortical dysfunction (i.e., the aphasias, agnosias, alexia, agraphia, amnesias, abulia), the dementias, movement disorders, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, and neuropsychiatric disease. Emphasis is placed on understanding the neural and cognitive mechanisms that underlie these clinical disorders.

 

Neuropsychological Assessment of Adults *

Instructor: Neuropsychology Faculty
Timeline: Every other year (Fall)
This graduate level “tools” course provides an overview of basic concepts and methods in the neuropsychological assessment of adults. It is primarily oriented to the assessment process and the manner by which neurologic and psychiatric patients present different clinical profiles during assessment of higher cortical function. Students learn conceptual models of neuropsychological assessment and how to recognize quantitative and qualitative aspects of test performance and behaviors that are most relevant to differential diagnosis. Instruction and experience in hands-on administration techniques are emphasized, along with ways of creatively tailoring the methods of assessment to the special needs and problems presented by individual cases. Fixed, flexible, and process oriented approaches to assessment are discussed.

 

Neuropsychological Assessment in Children

Instructor: Fennell
Timeline: Every other year
This graduate level “tools” course provides an overview of basic concepts and methods in the neuropsychological assessment of children. It parallels the adult neuropsychological assessment course, but is specific to children.



Neuroanatomy in the Medical Neurosciences*

Instructor: Ritz
Timeline: Yearly, Summer B
This is an intensive 5 week neuroanatomy course involving didactics and laboratory work. Students learn structural neuroanatomy of the CNS, from the synapse to the broad sensory, motor, limbic and cortical systems. This course is typically taken during the summer (Summer B) at the end of the second year of graduate work. No other courses or activities are taken during this time due to the rigorous demands and requirements of this class

 

Forensic Neuropsychology

Instructor: Bauer
Timeline: Every other year
This course is designed to examine ways in which neuropsychologists interact with the courts in matters of competency, sanity, and “mental injury” assessment. The course provides an introduction to the legal system, and reviews standards governing the forensic activities of mental health experts. We also emphasize professional issues that arise regularly in forensic neuropsychological assessment and consultation. Although the primary focus will be on cases/issues involving brain impairment, topics will all have more general clinical implications for psychopathology, diagnostic assessment, and intervention. Basic knowledge of neuropsychological syndromes and clinical assessment methodologies is assumed. Examples drawn from cases in which the instructor has participated will be used to illustrate basic points. Students will have the opportunity to work on one of these cases intensively and to prepare and present a forensic opinion about the patient or the case scenario.



Subcortical Functions in Cognition

Instructor: Crosson
Timeline: Every other year



Experimental Methods in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Neuroscience.

Instructors: Perlstein
Timeline: Every other year
One aim of this course is to provide an overview of current approaches for examining brain function in healthy individuals and clinical populations. Included are the classic lesion approach, structural and functional neuroimaging methods, virtual lesion approaches (e.g., transcranial magnetic stimulation, deep brain stimulation), autonomic and central psychophysiology, (ERP, SCR, startle), and novel biologic approaches (e.g., genetic and stem cell research). A second aim is to help students become critical consumers by discussing methodologic and interpretative dilemmas associated with each of the discussed approaches. Readings, lectures and discussions address methods, issues and conundrums in basic and clinical neuropsychological and cognitive neuroscience research



Neuropsychological Disorders in the Elderly

Instructor:
Timeline: Varies
The focus of the course is to familiarize students with the range of emotional and neurocognitive disorders that are associated with aging, the challenges facing older adults in the health care system, and issues surrounding the roles of adult children and spouses in providing care for older adults with neurologic and psychiatric illness. Students become knowledgeable about available community resources that might assist the older individual and their caretakers in dealing with devastating illnesses. The course involves readings, class discussions and presentations, review of case materials and video vignettes of patients.

 

Cognitive Aging: Very Late Life

Instructor: Marsiske
Much is known about the psychological aging in later life, but research is only now beginning to explore the new “final frontier”, the oldest old. Persons aged 80 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population. However, because very old adults have historically been a rare group, and because of the frequent challenges of including such indivdiauls in research due to physical and mental impairments, finding about aging often underrepresent these oldest individuals. This couse considers psychological aging in the very old including cognitive, personality and social changes with age. The class also considers terminal decline, and the psychological changes associated with death, what it mean to age “successfully in very old age, and the blurring distinction between normal and pathological aging in very late life.



Practicum in Clinical Psychology (Neuropsychology), Advanced Practicum in Neuropsychology, Advanced Specialty Practicum in Neuropsychology

Instructor: Varies (Bauer, Bowers, Crosson, Dede, Fennell, Heaton, Price)
See Clinical Training for description of these practicum experiences

 

OTHER COURSES TAUGHT BY NEUROPSYCHOLOGY FACULTY

Cognitive Bases of Behavior ^

Instructor: Bauer
Timeline: Every Fall
This is a proseminar in cognitive psychology, designed to familiarize the student with basic issues and recent advances in the field. Because it is offered as part of the clinical psychology core curriculum, we emphasize links between clinical phenomena (e.g., decision-making, memory disturbance, acquired cognitive disturbances, emotion-cognition interface) and theory and research in cognitive science

 

Adult Psychopathology^

Instructor: Dede
Timeline: Yearly
Required Core Course
This course is designed to familiarize the student with theoretical and practical issues in adult psychopathology. The course begins with a historical overview of diagnosis and classification and considers psychopathology from a number of distinct theoretical perspectives. Major diagnostic entities within DSM-IV are reviewed with emphasis on diagnostic criteria, etiology, and treatment. Various issues are discussed including psychiatric co-morbidity, cultural influences on the expression of mental disorders, and psychopathology in the seriously medical ill.

 

Adult Assessment^

Instructor: Fennell
Timeline: Yearly
Required Core Course
This course focuses on objective measures that are used in the assessment of intellect, personality, and mood in the adult. One goal is to help students learn to integrate information about psychopathology with data obtained from other clinical sources. These sources include: interviews, self-report measures , and a variety of individually administered psychological tests including intellectual measures.

Measurement, Research Design And Statistics I/II^

Instructor: Marsiske
Timeline: Yearly
Integration and interaction among research design, tests and measurements, and statistics." This is a challenging integration, and means that the many topics we will consider include scientific method, internal and external validity, principles guiding the design, conduct, and evaluation of measures, and interpretation and dissemination of statistical results, distributions and central tendency, inference making, general linear model and its embedded simple statistical procedures (evaluation and comparison means, correlation, regression, one- and multi-way analyses of variance with both between- and within-subjects factors), and reliability theory, evaluation of reliability and validity, scale construction, item analyses, item response theory, and scaling, bridges these two areas. Throughout the course, we’ll also consider the practice of doing and funding research, with topics including ethical issues in the conduct of research with humans, IRB guidelines and submission procedures, investigation of funding options for dissertations and beyond, preparation of funding proposals.

 

Applied Multivariate Methods in Psychology

Instructor: Marsiske
Timeline: Every other year (Spring)
This course examines the application of multivariate methods to the analyses of psychological data. The course will begin with a brief review of the matrix algebra concepts, the general linear model, and multiple regression. Major emphasis will be given to (1) the multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and its extensions (ANCOVA, Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance), and (2) factor analysis in its various forms (principal components, exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modeling). Special topics may be covered throughout the course, if time and interest allow. As an applied course, emphasis will be less on formulae and their derivation, and more on the review of (1) major assumptions, (2) the conditions under which the analysis might be appropriate, (3) implementation of the analysis in major statistical packages (SPSS, LISREL), and (4) interpretation of analyses.



C. OTHER NEUROPSYCHOLOGY COURSES AT UF
See UF Graduate Catalogue

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